Movie Review:: Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck

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I was never really a *big* fan of Nirvana, or the philosophical lyrics of their lead singer Kurt Cobain.  I mean, I was under ten years old when they reached the height of their popularity.  So I was much more into listening to Ren & Stimpy albums than I was into the grunge scene.  But in my 20s, I gained a sort of general fondness for a chunk of Nirvana’s songs.  At the very least, I really liked all of the covers on that Unplugged album.

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Movie Review: Whoop Dreams

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I confess…  I’m kind of obsessed with juggalo culture.  Now, wait a second!  I didn’t say I was a juggalo myself!  I just will stop whatever I’m doing and watch anything remotely revealing about America’s favorite ninjas.  If you are unfamiliar with the bunch, juggalos are fans of Insane Clown Posse, a clown-rap (?) group that is often richly soaked with family values and profanity laden death threats.  Their followers, the juggalos (or if you’re a lady, juggalette), are a perfect mixture of naive logic, white trash sensibility, intense kinship, and remarkable consistency to make poor life choices.  I enjoy observing juggalos almost as nature footage, because their basis of humanity is so starkly different from mine that they almost seem like a different species.

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Movie Review: Inside Llewyn Davis

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I had been trying to give my money to any theater willing to take it for a ticket to see Inside Llewyn Davis for over a month now.  I even just walked up to posters of the movie and forcefully jammed my cash into the face of Oscar Isaac, hoping that a ticket would magically come out of the bottom.  But all it did was get my money all dirty when it fell on the ground.  Lo and behold, this past weekend, the Regal theater by my place finally decided to screen the film!  I mean, I’m thrilled that every theater in America decided to play the (now 4% on Rotten Tomatoes) Legend of Hercules movie starring the neckless meathead from Twilight on its opening weekend, but maybe they could have sought to wide release the newest critically acclaimed film from the legendary Coen Brothers a little quicker than four weeks in limited?  I guess I’m saying that I don’t understand the release strategy for this film, and I’m a little bitter that I had to wait as long as I did to finally see it, because I ended up loving it and wished I could have seen it twice by now.

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Home Alone Music

I live in an three story apartment and I hate it.  I have always hated living in an apartment.  Partially because I can hear neighbors walking around in their rooms and yelling at their kids depressingly loud, but also because they can hear me doing whatever it is I am doing.  I have always been a connoisseur of loud music.  Living in an apartment totally hampers me enjoying this.  Sure, I bought some nice headphones that can really pump out the volume but they just can’t recreate the thump of a subwoofer.  So, when I come home from work and find that all the cars are gone and that everyone in the whole building isn’t home, I like to take advantage.  It’s times like these where I like to really nosh on some crunchy loud tunes.  Here is a list of some of my favorite music to listen to when no one is home.

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Mini Movie Review: Searching for Sugar Man

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Searching for Sugar Man is a documentary about a late-60s singer/songwriter simply known as “Rodriguez”.  He was a mysterious character; doing all his business dealings on street corners and basically being a homeless artist.  To the few people in America who bought his records, he was on the level of Bob Dylan.  But he never quite hit it big, and his record sales were almost non-existent.  After three years in the business, he faded into obscurity, and rumor had it that he committed suicide (by lighting himself on fire on stage).  Little did Rodriguez know, but his debut album sold over half a million copies in South Africa, and is considered as important an album as Abbey Road to the people over there.  But Rodriguez never saw a dime of that money, and never even knew that he was a superstar in another country.  The film explores the mystery of Rodriguez, why he never got his money, and why he never hit it big.

I think this is such a brilliantly constructed documentary.  So well designed and edited.  The filmmakers took all the knowledge they had on Rodriguez and they formed a story as good as most fiction films.  And it takes twists and turns as good as a Hollywood film as well.  I don’t want to give too much away about the story of Rodriguez, because it’s a very rewarding experience to just let it play out in front of your eyes, and it tickled my heart strings.  It’s a sad premise, but it turns into a feel good story.

It reminded me a little bit of Anvil: The Story of Anvil, about a band with great potential that didn’t go anywhere, then ends up sinking into depressing obscurity.  Only Anvil was more of a comedy, since the guys in that band where ridiculous.  But Searching for Sugar Man really explores the depressing nature of being a great artist with nowhere to go but down, and gives you the heartwarming feeling of finally seeing someone’s legacy get its well deserved respect.

It’s only 87 minutes, and the doc is so intriguing that it still felt like it flew by in under an hour.  Maybe if you really hate classic rock you won’t like this film as much as I did, but I think you can look past the actual music and still get a lot out of it.  I loved it.  Searching for Sugar Man is available now on Blu-ray/DVD, and I watched it for $4 on Amazon Prime Instant Video.

9.5 out of 10